A bike with a cardan shaft. Not new, but different.

Let's start with the big disadvantage of a bike with a propeller shaft: you will have quite a lot of eyes and attention, questions to answer and explanations to give. In other words, the drive shaft is different, though not at all new.

The modern propeller shaft, low-maintenance and durable.


After all, the basis of the technology used is almost as old as the bicycle itself. The invention of shaft drive bicycles dates back to the late nineteenth century. They were wildly popular at the time, because the wide clothes of that era could not get into the chain, with all its consequences. The first cardan shafts were made of cast iron, lead-heavy and high resistance. As it was not possible to combine the shaft with gears for a long time, the system fell out of favour.

The technology has improved, the principle has remained pretty much the same in all these years.


Nowadays, modern production techniques do allow the combination with gears. Efficiency has also improved enormously. The loss - compared to a clean, well-lubricated and tensioned chain - is around 5%. As a result, the advantages of this drive (clean, low-maintenance and safe) can again be exploited to the full.


Beixo has been working with this technology since 2005 and we can honestly say that it is an extremely high-quality and extremely durable drive system. Read here some experiences with a bicycle with cardan shaft drive on the forum From the Cyclists' Union.

The benefits

  • Stable energy transmission from a propeller shaft
  • Technically very high-quality drive
  • Extremely low maintenance
  • No more tensioning or lubrication
  • Drive as a design feature
  • Never a garment between the chain again
  • Keeps working, doesn't run off the sprockets like a chain can
  • Very clean, requires little or no lubrication
  • Silent
  • No need for a fragile chaincase
  • Extremely durable


The beixo propeller shaft comes with a three-year warranty. Without any problems.

Read more about bikes with a cardan shaft?